Nothing better than that!

Build Your Own Fat Burner Bio-Robot!!!

Name: *
Email: *
Your information is safe with us! Anti Spam Policy

Posts in category Blog

Oral Sex Plus Smoking a Cancer Danger for Men

Original post: https://www.webmd.com/men/news/20171020/oral-sex-plus-smoking-a-cancer-danger-for-men?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Risk of head and neck tumors tied to HPV infection jumps to 15 percent for this group, study finds

Click Here For More

Solving the Mystery of Chronic Fatigue

Original post: https://www.webmd.com/chronic-fatigue-syndrome/news/20171020/solving-the-mystery-of-chronic-fatigue?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Researchers want to better understand the origins of, and possible treatments for, a badly named disorders that affects millions of Americans.

Click Here For More

What Does Your Medical Record Say About You?

Original post: https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/news/20171013/what-does-your-medical-record-say-about-you?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Patient advocates urge transparency with medical records, but getting them isn’t always easy — or wise.

Click Here For More

New Harvard initiative to tackle U.S. inequality

Original post: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2017/10/new-harvard-initiative-to-tackle-u-s-inequality/

Dean of Social Science Claudine Gay last week launched a multiyear initiative on U.S. inequality while announcing a new postdoctoral fellowship to begin next fall.

Putting “urgent, focused attention” on the complex problems surrounding economic growth, political stability, social trust, and public health, Gay convened a daylong symposium on Oct. 13 designed to inform scholarship and public debate.

Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith opened the symposium by quoting Harvard historian Walter Johnson: “We are seeing levels of inequality not seen since the Gilded Age.”

“With the people in this room, we have a real opportunity to turn the tide and make society work for everyone,” Smith added.

Participants included academic leaders in economics, political science, psychology, sociology, history, and law. The morning session, “Work, Family & Opportunity,” featured Sandra Black of the University of Texas, Alan Krueger of Princeton, and Betsey Stevenson of the University of Michigan, all of whom served on the Obama administration’s Council of Economic Advisors.

<figure id="attachment_231822" style="width

Click Here For More

Korean OBEsity Surgical Treatment Study (KOBESS): protocol of a prospective multicentre cohort study on obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

Original post: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/cgi/content/short/7/10/e018044?rss=1

Introduction

Bariatric surgery effectively induces long-term weight loss in Western populations. However, its effectiveness in Asians remains to be confirmed objectively. The Korean Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery proposes the first prospective cohort study on Koreans undergoing bariatric surgery.

Methods and analysis

The Korean OBEsity Surgical treatment Study (KOBESS) is a prospective, multicentre, single-arm, observational, cohort study on morbidly obese patients who undergo primary sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in Korea. In total, 100 consecutive obese Asian patients who will undergo bariatric surgery will be recruited in 2016–2017; follow-up will be for 1 year. Primary outcomes are change in body weight and waist circumference at 1 year. All patients will undergo anthropometry, laboratory tests, bioelectrical impedance analysis, gastrofibroscopy, polysomnography and fat-measuring CT before and after surgery. Patients with diabetes will also undergo perioperative oral glucose tolerance and endocrinological hormone tests. Hypertensive patients will also undergo perioperative echocardiography and carotid Doppler ultrasonography. Femal

Click Here For More

Whats up doc? A national cross-sectional study of psychological wellbeing of hospital doctors in Ireland

Original post: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/cgi/content/short/7/10/e018023?rss=1

Objectives

To measure levels of psychological distress, psychological wellbeing and self-stigma in hospital doctors in Ireland.

Design

National cross-sectional study of randomised sample of hospital doctors. Participants provided sociodemographic data (age, sex, marital status), work grade (consultant, higher/basic specialist trainee), specialty and work hours and completed well-being questionnaires (the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, WHO Well-being Index, General Health Questionnaire) and single-item scales on self-rated health and self-stigma.

Setting

Irish publicly funded hospitals and residential institutions.

Participants

1749 doctors (response rate of 55%). All hospital specialties were represented except radiology.

Results

Half of participants were men (50.5%). Mean hours worked per week were 57 hours. Over half (52%) rated their health as very good/excellent, while 50.5% reported positive subjective well-being (WHO-5). Over a third (35%) experienced psychological distress (General Health Questionnaire 12). Severe/extremely severe symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress were evident in 7.2%, 6.1% and 9.5% of participants (Depression, A

Click Here For More

Stigma among Singaporean youth: a cross-sectional study on adolescent attitudes towards serious mental illness and social tolerance in a multiethnic population

Original post: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/cgi/content/short/7/10/e016432?rss=1

Objectives

Stigma against mental illnesses is one of the significant obstacles faced by mental health service users and providers. It can develop at a young age and is also influenced by culture. Youths in Southeast Asian countries are under-represented in mental health research, thus this study aims to explore the dimensions of stigma and social tolerance and examine its correlates in the younger, multiethnic population of Singapore.

Design

An online survey collected data with sociodemographic questions, the Attitudes Towards Serious Mental Illness (Adolescent version) Scale, Social Tolerance Scale and an open-text question on words or phrases participants associated with the term ‘mental illness’. Principal component analysis and multiple regression models were conducted to investigate the factor structure of the attitudes and social tolerance scales and their sociodemographic correlates.

Participants

Participants included 940 youths aged 14–18 years old who were residing in Singapore at the time of the survey and were recruited through local schools.

Results

About a quarter of the students (22.6%) reported participating in mental heal

Click Here For More

Lying Down After an Epidural: A Smart Idea?

Original post: https://www.webmd.com/women/news/20171019/lying-down-after-an-epidural-a-smart-idea?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Study found it increased chances of having a normal delivery

Click Here For More

Nature-based care opportunities and barriers in oncology contexts: a modified international e-Delphi survey

Original post: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/cgi/content/short/7/10/e017456?rss=1

Objective

To develop recommendations regarding opportunities and barriers for nature-based care in oncology contexts using a structured knowledge generation process involving relevant healthcare and design experts.

Design

Four-round modified electronic Delphi study. Oncology patients’ nature-based recommendations, uncovered in preceding qualitative investigation, were included in the first round for the expert participants’ consideration. Key items (opportunities and barriers) were developed using data aggregation and synthesis, followed by item prioritisation and 10-point Likert scale ranking (1=not important, 10=very important). Descriptive statistics were calculated to assess items of highest importance representing expert recommendations.

Context

Online Delphi process constituting an electronic international survey.

Participants

A purposive sample of 200 potential panellists (recruitment target n=40) comprising healthcare practitioners, managers, designers, architects and researchers were invited to participate; experts were identified via research networks, snowballing and systematic literature review.

Results

38 experts across se

Click Here For More

Harvard scientists receive nearly $8.5M through NIH program

Original post: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2017/10/harvard-scientists-receive-nearly-8-5m-through-nih-program/

Eight Harvard scientists will receive nearly $8.5 million in funding through the National Institutes of Health’s High Risk, High Reward program to support research into a host of questions, ranging from understanding humans’ music faculty to the growth of axons to storing and reading out information from DNA.

Ahmed Badran, a postdoctoral fellow in chemistry and chemical biology, will receive an Early Independence Award; Charles Lieber, the Joshua and Beth Friedman University Professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, will receive a Pioneer Award; Jeffrey Macklis, the Max and Anne Wien Professor of Life Sciences in the Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology and professor of surgery and neurology, will receive a Pioneer Award; Samuel Mehr, postdoctoral fellow in psychology, will receive an Early Independence Award; Sherri Rose, associate professor of health care policy, will receive a New Innovator Award; Alexander Schier, Leo Erikson Life Sciences Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, will receive a Pioneer Award; David Sinclair, professor of genetics, will receive a Pioneer Award; and Zirui Song, assistant profe

Click Here For More

Transform Your Body With This 100% FREE Trick!

Name: *
Email: *
Your information is safe with us! Anti Spam Policy - Terms